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The Hustler’s Playbook: How to Deal with Your Inner Critic

Too many people suffer from a too-small vision of themselves. They don’t believe they are good enough, pretty enough, smart enough, rich enough, or valuable enough. They don’t recognize their own worth. They don’t (yet) recognize that they are unique, that they are special, and that they have something to offer.

They are bigger than they know, and they are more capable than they could ever imagine. And so are you.

The Voice of Your Inner Critic

Each of us is born with an ‘inner critic.” The “inner critic” is that little voice inside you, constantly reminding you that you aren’t good enough, that there is no way you are as good as you think you are, and that you are an impostor.

Your “inner critic” is really made up of two voices.. The first voice you hear is the voice of your parents. That voice is only telling you that you aren’t good enough because your parents always worry about you getting hurt. This is true even when you are an adult. It’s what parents do, and unless you learn not to limit your children’s beliefs about their capabilities, you will do the same.

The second voice is the voice of society. When this voice speaks to you, what you are really hearing are the fears of others who wouldn’t take the risks that you are taking. That voice criticizes you because the many who make up society’s voice are afraid to face their own fears, to become who and what they might become. They fear being judged, and that voice is your fear of being judged, too.

You hear society’s objection because your success can make others feel bad about themselves. Jealously and envy are very deeply set human emotions. The world is full of critics and haters. But it’s also full of believers who will support you.

How to Respond to Your Inner Critic

Learn to tell respond to the part of your inner critic that is your parent’s fears by saying, “Listen, I know you are afraid that I will be hurt, and maybe I will. But I have a gift to share and charge to keep, so I’ll be careful and take my chances anyway.”

Your parents are always going to fear for your safety and your happiness. That’s their voice you sometimes hear.

Learn to respond to the part of the inner critic that is society’s voice by saying, “Oh, I’m so sorry. What I am doing isn’t for you. It’s for the people who appreciate my gift and my mission. I’m going to go ahead and live my dream now. I hope someday you can join me!” That voice is other people’s fears. They’re not yours, and they’re not for you. Let them go.

Learning to respond to the voice of your inner critic is the first step to developing a bigger, brighter, bolder vision of yourself.


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