They're Looking Back

They’re Looking Back

You’re using social media tools to look at your prospective clients. You’re using things like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook to get an understanding of who your prospective client really is, what they’re thinking about, and how you might make a connection. And that’s all well and good; you should be doing those things.

But while you’re using the social tools to research your prospects, it’s important to remember that this channel works both directions. You’re looking at your prospective clients, and they’re looking back at you.

When you send that LinkedIn connection request to your prospective client, they’re pulling up your profile to review it before they accept. They’re trying to get some understanding as to why you want to connect with them, what you want from them, and how you might be valuable.

They’re looking at your picture. They’re checking out your headline and your job title. They’re looking at who else you’re connected to. And they’re looking at your recommendations. If your connection invite indicated that you share a group, they’re looking at what groups you belong too. They’re researching you.

Your LinkedIn profile, your Twitter feed, your Facebook page (and all your other social tools) are your own personal About page.

What does your About page say about you? Does it indicate that you’ve got business acumen and deep situational knowledge? Does it indicate that you’re a value creator with the ability to help your perspective client improve their business? Does it give them some indication of your past successes and what your great interests are? Or is it really an incomplete resume?

You’re looking at your prospective clients. And they’re looking back. What do you want them to see?


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Comments

comments

  • http://cashwithatrueconscience.com/rbblog Ryan Biddulph

    What a salient point Anthony.

    We forget the 2 way street aspect of social media at times. We are caught up prospecting and forget that we are being prospected too. Make sure to put your best foot forward when setting up social media sites, About Me pages, and any sites where you share who you are and how you can help individuals.

    We are always being researched, really, each time someone visits our blogs, social networks, or moves forward and calls us. By remembering this you can more effectively find perfect matches, for when you decide to be transparent, and fully share who you are and how you can help individuals, you will most definitely find those matches who value what you value and wish to build a professional relationship with you.

    Thanks for sharing Anthony.

    Ryan

    • http://www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      Thanks for your always thoughtful comments, Ryan!

  • http://twitter.com/MZazeela Marc Zazeela

    Excellent points, Anthony. I see so many folks don’t get it.

    Too many Linkedin profiles read like resumés. If you already have a job, why post a resumé like summary?

    If I am a prospective customer, I am not too concerned about your college education or your 20 years work history. I want to know who you are now and why I would want to open up a dialogue.

    Cheers,
    Marc

    • http://www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      Spot on, as always, Marc!

  • http://smallbusinesstalent.com/ Stephen Lahey

    Increased visibility makes the need to embrace the fundamentals of sales / marketing / business that much more important. Also, being human doesn’t hurt either. : )

  • http://www.NateAnglin.com/ Nate Anglin

    This is absolutely correct.

    Also, it drives me stupid when I get the standard accept my LinkedIn request. Make sure to personalize this as you would in real life. Do your homework.

    • http://www.www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      I agree, Nate. Even if it’s just pointing out that you share a group.

    • http://www.www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      I agree, Nate. Even if it’s just pointing out that you share a group.

  • http://www.ryanridgway.com/ Ryan Ridgway

    Excellent post Anthony. My newest role is more of a business dev. role that requires me to navigate through an organization and bridge relationships and agreements, so LinkedIn is a huge part of what I do! I found that initially my LinkedIn resume was littered with “top salesman” type of dialogue and although that may be the case, any prospective client viewing my profile my furthermore prevent me from being top salesman ;) I’ve now tried to incorporate a blend of sales and customer focused expertise into my profile and I think it will prove to be beneficial. Thank you for reiterating this ideology to others! Fantastic blog by the way – Ryan

    • http://www.www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      Thanks for sharing, Ryan. I think looking through the customer’s eyes is a good idea. I believe our clients don’t hire us for our sales skills. They hire us to help them get the results they need.

  • Judy Martin

    Anthony,
    So simple yet really complex in that there is so much to think about when putting ourselves out there. Made me think about a few things that need some attention.

    • http://www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      Me too. I have a bit of work to myself!



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