Self Loathing Sales Experts

Self-loathing sales experts. They’re self-loathing because they hate the part of themselves that once sold and felt that selling is something that one does to another person, instead of something that benefits the client. It makes them feel bad about themselves.

Because they believed that they were treated like a commodity, they believe everyone shares their experience. Without exception, they believe that any proactive, outbound attempt at gaining an appointment makes one a monster. And invariably, they shout at the top of their lungs that buyers now have all the power in the relationship, as if the buyer hasn’t had the checkbook, options, and the ability to decide who to buy from forever.

In their minds, the only way to create an opportunity is through a passive, reactive approach. They believe that the only way to share an insight is one-to-many, that it is not something one could do after calling, scheduling a meeting, and sitting face-to-face with their prospective client, who is now made out to be the most difficult challenge the salesperson may ever face. This is to believe that salespeople have so little to offer clients that they should tuck their tail between their legs and run and hide.

There is never a reason to let someone feed you their fears. You should refuse with extreme prejudice any advice from someone whose beliefs include the presupposition that your intentions are bad at worse, or misdirected at best. You should reject out of hand any advice from a person who shares ideas that or would cause you to believe that what you are doing is not valuable to the people you serve.

But most of all, there is a marketplace of ideas from which you can select what you believe. There is no reason to adopt a pessimistic, cynical, and disempowered belief system when it comes to selling. The reason the self-loathing sales expert shares this content with you is that they have no actionable or practical advice that you can use to improve your sales results.

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