The Inefficient is Really Efficient

It’s easier to send an email than make a phone call. An email allows you to think through what you want to say, providing you with the ability to go back over what you have written to get things right. Making the call requires that you have chops, that you engage with your client, and maybe even think on your feet. Because it is easier to send the email does not make it the right choice. What matters is that it produces the necessary outcome.

It’s easier to schedule a phone call than it is to show up. It might take two hours to reach your client, and the meeting is only going to last 20 minutes. A phone call may be more convenient for you, giving you back an hour and half of your day. The question, however, is what is the impact of your presence during this conversation?

It’s easier to allow marketing to “nurture” your dream clients, sending them emails that are supposed to be relevant to their “persona.” It’s much more efficient to let someone else attempt to do this work for you, and who knows whether these prospects are even considering changing now. It’s easier to wait until they signal that they are interested. By downloading a white paper? Methinks not. What is the impact of you not being known or proving that you can create value for the client when they do have a need?

There are a lot of things that aren’t convenient. There are many possible ways to be more efficient with your limited time and energy. But much of the time, efficiency is the wrong factor to use to decide. Human relationships are inefficient. They require care and feeding. They require effort. That means that the inefficient is more effective in producing the outcome you need, making it the truly efficient choice—and making what you believe to be efficient to be the least inefficient choice because it doesn’t generate a preference to work with you.

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