Don’t Do It Because It Is Wrong. Not Because of Social Media.

“Don’t do that because, in the age of social media, you could hurt your reputation.”

Wrong. The reason not to do something immoral, illegal, unethical, or simply self-oriented is not because someone might post about it on social media. It is not because word of mouth is now broadcast with a digital megaphone. The reason not to do these things is because they conflict with your values.

Character Is Non-Negotiable

Character isn’t negotiable. It isn’t something that you have when you believe you might be found out, and lack when you believe no one is looking. You have character, or your do not.

  • If your dream client doesn’t know what they should be paying for your services and you decide to charge them more because they lack the knowledge or experience to know better, you are violating step one of being a trusted advisor. There may be nothing illegal about charging a client who lacks information a higher price, but it is the kind of egocentric move that displays a lack of character and self-orientation.
  • Pushing a prospective client to make a decision they are not ready to make isn’t illegal. It may not rise to being immoral, but we could argue about whether or not that is true. Blasting through a prospect’s objections and treating their concerns as unimportant so you can get ink on paper isn’t about serving them, even if you believe that your solution is exactly what they need. Instead, it demonstrates a lack of caring.

Making the sale under these conditions doesn’t make you a good salesperson. It means you aren’t a very good salesperson at all. If you were a good salesperson, you’d possess the skillful means to make the sale and help your client with their concerns.

Don’t worry about social media. Worry about your character. Don’t worry about other people finding out and deciding not to business with you. Worry about who you are as a person. Good character prevents you from ever having to worry about a bad reputation. And character is worth referring.

Filed under: Sales 3.0

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