Delivering Experience

My wife and I had no sooner sat down to dinner and the waitress was already standing at the edge of our table, ready to take our drink orders. That might seem like good service, but we literally hadn’t even placed the napkin on our laps. So, we ordered something to drink.

The drinks were brought to our table immediately, and the waitress asked if she could take our orders. This is one of the funky, cool, independent restaurants we frequent, and since we always order the same thing, we gave the waitress our order. When the waitress left the table, we started talking about all of the stuff we have going on with kids, work, and other family stuff. We were catching up after not really having a chance to during our always hectic weeks.

It might have been four minutes before the waitress was back with our food. She quickly and efficiently dropped the food on the table and asked if we needed anything else. Neither of us had our phones turned on. We didn’t have enough time to even begin to have a conversation, but now our dinner was sitting in front of us.

The food was great and we took our time eating. As we were halfway through dinner, our waitress was back with our check, leaving it on the table and speeding off to clear the surrounding tables. She didn’t ask about dessert. She didn’t ask about coffee. She didn’t ask if we’d like to order anything else. We would have said “yes,” to almost anything she offered just to have the time to hang out and chat.

I thought maybe it was our waitress, but I looked around and noticed that the entire staff was moving at this same pace. In fact, all the tables that had been full when we walked in had been turned, and there was no line of people waiting to be seated or served.

Level 1 Value is a product. The value you create at Level 1 is efficiency. That’s great for transactional sales models, like McDonald’s. But it isn’t the right level of value for funky, cool, eclectic restaurants that are competing on experience, Level 2 Value. Experience isn’t about efficiency. Experience is about how you make people feel.

If what you sell is experience, then efficiency isn’t the right area to focus. The right place to focus is feelings.

Filed under: Sales 3.0, Value

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