The Sales Blog http://thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:14:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 Stop Saying “Losers” http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/21/stop-saying-losers/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/21/stop-saying-losers/#respond Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:07:16 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46467 Stop Saying “Losers” is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Stop Saying “Losers” is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino I read a magazine article this week in which the author described underperforming salespeople as “losers.” There was a time when I might have used similar language. I’ve heard some well known voices in the sales community use similar language. But [...]]]>

Stop Saying “Losers” is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

I read a magazine article this week in which the author described underperforming salespeople as “losers.” There was a time when I might have used similar language. I’ve heard some well known voices in the sales community use similar language.

But underperforming salespeople are not losers; they’re just underperforming.

Wrong Role

A lot of the time, the underperforming salesperson is in the wrong role. They are no more a loser than the hiring manager who put the underperforming salesperson in that role. They both may have made a mistake, the hiring manager by not recognizing that the person might not be a good fit or hiring out of desperation, and the non-salesperson for taking the wrong job.

Lack Training and Coaching

Some underperforming salespeople haven’t received any real training or development. They’ve never had good coaching. The organization that fails to deliver these things isn’t made up of a bunch of losers either. The organizations that fail these underperforming salespeople are stretched thin to provide all of the support their salespeople need, and most place too many internal burdens on their sales managers, eliminating time to help their sales force improve.

Poor Leadership

Salespeople who fail often have poor leaders, and in the worst of cases, no leader. That doesn’t make them a loser, and it doesn’t mean their leader is a loser either. It means both could use some help. Many in sales management roles didn’t have a good model as a leader when they sold. They’re mostly doing what they’ve had done to them, whether that be micromanaging, focusing exclusively on activity, or plain neglect.

Be Kind

When people hear you use words like “loser” to describe people with performance issues, they believe that you will be as judgmental when they have performance issues (worse still if you write it). It indicates that you believe that 100% blame the lies with the underperforming “salesperson,” which is occasionally true.

Using negative words to identify an poor-performing individual is a personal attack. These words betray a lack of respect. They destroy trust and moral authority.

Notice this cat in the picture above has the L on backwards. That’s sometimes true.

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Leaders Focus On the Future http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/20/leaders-focus-on-the-future/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/20/leaders-focus-on-the-future/#respond Mon, 21 Jul 2014 01:00:13 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46461 Leaders Focus On the Future is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Leaders Focus On the Future is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Leadership is no easy task. To be successful you have to manage a large and complex set of competing priorities. It’s tough to make decisions under pressure. It’s difficult to sometimes know what needs to be done now. And [...]]]>

Leaders Focus On the Future is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Leadership is no easy task. To be successful you have to manage a large and complex set of competing priorities. It’s tough to make decisions under pressure. It’s difficult to sometimes know what needs to be done now. And it’s tough to do good work when so many people are clamoring for your time and attention.

But there are two categories that all of these demands fall into, and it’s worth thinking about how much time you spend in each category.

Important Now

A lot of what shows up on a leader’s desk is about the here and now. There are decisions that need to be made now, and there are urgent problems that the leader is responsible for helping to solve. There are also opportunities that must be pursued right now or they may be lost forever.

If there isn’t an endless parade of the “ important now” problems, challenges, issues, and opportunities vying for your limited attention, you are doing something wrong as a leader. You must make time to help solve the problems, deal with the challenges, and capitalize on the opportunities. If you don’t spend some time here, neither you nor your team will produce the results of which you are capable.

But “important now” is only part of what needs your attention.

Important in the Future

A leader’s job is about more than “now.” The leader’s job is really about the future. With all the urgencies of the day-to-day tasks of leadership, the future can easily get crowded out. So a great leader blocks time for the future.

You need to block time to read, study, and educate yourself about the trends that will impact your organization and your clients.

You need to block time to brainstorm and imagine the future. You need to consider all of the ways that you might move the team you lead to that future. You need to spend time sharing your vision.

You need time to reflect on your values, the culture you need to build, and how you are going to share those values and tell those stories.

The investment of time making the future a reality means spending time building the next generation of leaders, coaching and mentoring people as deep into your team as possible.

The future is going to require that people believe and act differently. That means time must be spent ensuring they have the skills to bring that future to life.

Without spending time on the future, you can lose the possibility of capturing it.

A great leader deals with what’s important now, but always with an eye towards the future. Make sure you balance your time, your effort, your energy, and your investment in people between what’s important now and your future.

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The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Don’t Hold Back http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/19/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-dont-hold-back/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/19/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-dont-hold-back/#respond Sun, 20 Jul 2014 01:14:21 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46455 The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Don’t Hold Back is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Don’t Hold Back is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino I remember the decision I made to change my life and hold myself to a higher standard than anyone expected of me. It happened in an instant, and the backlash was almost as fast. Some friends, and [...]]]>

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Don’t Hold Back is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

I remember the decision I made to change my life and hold myself to a higher standard than anyone expected of me. It happened in an instant, and the backlash was almost as fast. Some friends, and a few family members, were immediately critical, attacking me for the changes I had made. Some said, “Oh, look, you’re holier than thou.” Others said it more directly, leveling accusations like, “You think you’re better than us,” or “You think you’re better than everyone.”

The truth of the matter was, the standard I set wasn’t for them. No decision I made was about anyone else, nor did I ever compare myself to them. I was just no longer willing to go on living the way I had been living. I decided to hustle instead.

You cannot pull your punches, restrain yourself, or hold yourself back because what you do is going to bother other people, even the people you love. You must hustle.

It’s Not About You

Some people are going to be threatened by your success.

When you hold yourself to a higher standard, some people are going to criticize and attack you because your higher standard and the accompanying success make them feel bad about themselves. The fact that you have raised your internal bar will remind them that they haven’t raised their own.

Other people are going to attack your decision to hustle because they are fearful. They fear that you are going to move on and leave them behind. They fear that they are going to lose your love or your friendship. They’ll pretend to be happy for you when they can, but when the fear shows up they’ll attack you.

Give It All You’ve Got

It is true that as a hustler you are going to outgrow some people who haven’t raised their internal standards. This doesn’t mean that you ever ignore them, that their relationships aren’t important, or that you ever treat them poorly. In fact, you treat them better than you have ever treated them. What you don’t do is allow their low standards to keep you from raising your own. You don’t let their vision of themselves become your vision of yourself.

When the people who attack you are the people who love you and fear losing you, you remind them that you will always be there for them, and that you aren’t leaving them behind. You do this by making time for them. But you don’t ever stop hustling. You’ll never become the best and brightest version of yourself if you allow other’s fears to prevent you from acting. And you’ll never be able to care for the people who count on you if decide to be a non-hustler.

Others are going to judge you for your decision to hustle, to succeed at the highest level of which you are capable. Don’t ever let those judgements prevent you from hustling. You owe it yourself. And you owe it to the world to make your mark.

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Have It Your Way http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/18/have-it-your-way/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/18/have-it-your-way/#respond Sat, 19 Jul 2014 00:32:03 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46450 Have It Your Way is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Have It Your Way is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino This morning I drove my teenage son through Burger King (I know, I know. I am waiting for Children’s Service to arrive any minute now). It was 10:05 AM, and my son wanted lunch. The fancy electronic menu showed only [...]]]>

Have It Your Way is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

This morning I drove my teenage son through Burger King (I know, I know. I am waiting for Children’s Service to arrive any minute now).

It was 10:05 AM, and my son wanted lunch. The fancy electronic menu showed only breakfast choices, so I asked: “Are you serving lunch?” The kid taking orders said, “No. We’re serving breakfast.” I said, “Sorry. My kid wants lunch so were going to go somewhere else.” Without delay, the order-taker asked, “What does he want?” I rattled all off the different things he wanted. The order-taker said, “No problem. We’ll make it for him.”

It took a few minutes to prepare his order while we waited at the drive-through window.

The total order came to $5.69.

The restaurant wasn’t prepared to serve lunch. It doesn’t matter what the profit margin is on the order, it isn’t enough for the restaurant to go to the trouble. What’s interesting is the culture in this Burger King.

It wasn’t the manager who agreed to make the order. It was an employee. I’ve seen people with far greater titles and far more responsibility with less decision-making authority. Somehow, this kid was empowered to make a decision to serve the customer, rules and breakfast be damned.

The kid at the window also recognized he had some responsibility to serve the customers, not just take their orders. He recognized he was going to lose a customer and asked what he could to change that. I told him, and he did what he needed to do.

The kid that took the order wasn’t at the window. It was a young girl. She smiled and said “Thank you” as she handed me the food-of-a-seriously-questionable-nutritional-value that my son had ordered.

Culture matters. Empowerment matters. Responsibility matters. This is noteworthy because the employees in this story make minimum wage (or something close to it). What then should be possible with higher paid, more experienced people?

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You Have One Set of Values http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/17/you-have-one-set-of-values/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/17/you-have-one-set-of-values/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 01:00:28 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46446 You Have One Set of Values is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

You Have One Set of Values is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino I received an email from a subscriber to my weekly newsletter. She was unhappy with something I’d written about my childhood, and she asked me to please limit my email newsletter to business-related topics. [You can read the [...]]]>

You Have One Set of Values is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

I received an email from a subscriber to my weekly newsletter. She was unhappy with something I’d written about my childhood, and she asked me to please limit my email newsletter to business-related topics. [You can read the post 7 Things I Was Never Allowed to Do for yourself. I’m pretty sure it was number 5 that bothered her, and I can understand how it might.]

But there is no personal life and professional life. There is just life. You are who you are, wherever you are and whatever you are doing.

You don’t have one set of values when it comes to business and a separate set of values when it comes to your personal life. But even if you did, it wouldn’t matter. Your real values would still be the lowest standard you set for yourself.

If you wouldn’t dare steal in your personal life but you do steal at work, you are still a thief. The location as to where the theft occurs doesn’t change it’s nature (or yours).

If you are rude to people and treat them poorly at work while being a prince at home, you are still a rude person. The fact that you are polite to some people doesn’t change the fact that you are rude to others.

If you are a gossip at work it’s likely you are a gossip at home, too. But even if you didn’t gossip at home you’d still be a gossip.

If you have a substance abuse problem that doesn’t prevent you from showing up to the office, you are a still a person with a substance abuse problem, even if you are highly functioning. Substance abuse may begin as a value issue, but addiction that comes later is an illness. You are still ill, whether at home or at work.

What you do on your personal time is your business, but it doesn’t change your values. Your standards for yourself are yours and yours alone. You are who you are, wherever you are and whatever you are doing.

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The ROI of Softer Stuff http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/16/the-roi-of-softer-stuff/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/16/the-roi-of-softer-stuff/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 01:56:02 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46436 The ROI of Softer Stuff is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The ROI of Softer Stuff is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Revenue improvement. Profit increases. Cost reductions. Efficiencies. These are all tangible, measurable improvements that your product, service, or solution can produce. They make it possible for you to generate and share an ROI with your client. As important as [...]]]>

The ROI of Softer Stuff is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Revenue improvement. Profit increases. Cost reductions. Efficiencies.

These are all tangible, measurable improvements that your product, service, or solution can produce. They make it possible for you to generate and share an ROI with your client. As important as it is to produce a business case, these aren’t the only factors buyers consider when making decisions. They don’t move you to trusted advisor, consultative salesperson, and Level 4 Value Creator status.

Trust is soft. There isn’t a great way to measure it. But without trust nothing that you present really matters. What do you believe your dream client believes the ROI on trust to be?

Caring, like trust, is soft. Your dream client will never list “caring” in a row on a spreadsheet and score you against your competitor (they won’t do that with trust, either). But when your dream client makes a decision, how much they believe you care about them and their challenges is a factor they weigh heavily. If you don’t believe this is true, share with them how much commission you hope to make on their sale and see how it changes your relationship.

Business acumen and situational knowledge (or in the common vernacular, insights) are too soft to be measured. But people in positions of authority value people with the ability to help them deal with their most complex business challenges. They value people with ideas. They trade lower price for greater insights. They trade a marginally better ROI for real relationships of value.

Collaboration isn’t a metric (at least not one I’ve ever seen). But you are being judged by how easy you are to do business with and how open you are to helping your dream client adjust your solution to precisely fit their needs. They value your ability to help them build consensus, and they appreciate being armed to have high value conversations within their own organization.

None of this is to say that your financial ROI isn’t important. It is important, and critically so in some deals. But so is the softer stuff that gives you the opportunity to better develop the ROI, to position yourself as the right partner, to drive a wedge between you and your competitors, and to frame your solution in a way that resonates with your dream client contacts.

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Your Personal Sales Style http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/15/your-personal-sales-style/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/15/your-personal-sales-style/#respond Wed, 16 Jul 2014 01:31:02 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46432 Your Personal Sales Style is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Your Personal Sales Style is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino There is no sales “style” that is winging it. It isn’t a “style” to go into a sales meeting unprepared or unable to create value for your client or dream client. That “style’ is called lazy, and it has never [...]]]>

Your Personal Sales Style is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

There is no sales “style” that is winging it. It isn’t a “style” to go into a sales meeting unprepared or unable to create value for your client or dream client. That “style’ is called lazy, and it has never been effective nor has it ever been fashionable.

You aren’t making a decision around “style” decision when you decide to fish around for something personal on which to build rapport as a way to open a sales call. That is called “wasting your client’s time.” There is room to know your client on a personal level, but this approach early in a relationship subtracts from the value you need to create.

You do not have a “style” that is skipping stages in your sales process. There are verifiable outcomes that need to be gained for you and your client in order to be productive in exploring working together on an opportunity. Doing partial work isn’t a “style” decision; it’s a recipe for losing an opportunity and later, should the Gods of sales have mercy on you, failing your client should you somehow win the business.

Avoiding difficult conversations isn’t a “style” either. It’s fear. Lacking the chops necessary to have difficult conversation is a weakness. Your clients and dream clients need help dealing with difficult issues, and they trust people whose “style” is to help them deal with complex issues.

Whenever you lean on your “style” as an excuse for not doing something the way it should really be done, you are avoiding something that you fear doing or something you are just too lazy to do. These aren’t style decisions; they’re rationalizations, they’re your way of dealing with your unwillingness to improve.

You are unique. You are allowed to have a personality, and you must be human if you really want to connect with your clients. Bad choices don’t make a style.

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Leaders Don’t Hire Weak People http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/14/leaders-dont-hire-weak-people/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/14/leaders-dont-hire-weak-people/#respond Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:00:17 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46427 Leaders Don’t Hire Weak People is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Leaders Don’t Hire Weak People is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino There are a lot of things that a leader can get wrong, but not many can cause as much damage as hiring poorly. New leaders, young and old, sometimes make the mistake of hiring people who they believe to [...]]]>

Leaders Don’t Hire Weak People is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

There are a lot of things that a leader can get wrong, but not many can cause as much damage as hiring poorly.

New leaders, young and old, sometimes make the mistake of hiring people who they believe to be weaker than themselves. Some leaders are afraid that by hiring someone equally as strong as they are, their personal worth and value will somehow be diminished. Some are afraid that if someone on their team is a star, that person will eventually take their job–or worse, take their boss’s job.

These same leaders try to be the “keeper of all knowledge” and “the holder of all relationships.” Knowledge is power; if your team doesn’t how to do anything well enough to do it on their own, you are never uneccesary. If your people never have relationships within the organization, there is no risk of anyone learning just how good they really are, and your position is safe. So thinks the weak leader.

A leader’s performance is the sum total of the result of his team. The weaker the team, the poorer the results. By hiring weak people who don’t threaten his power, the weak leader assures that he is the indispensable man. But he also assures that his results are less than they should be, that he creates dependents, that his people are viewed poorly, that he deprives people of meaningful work, and that his team eventually grows to resent him.

A strong leader hires people who are as strong or stronger than she is. She finds people with runway to join her team so she can build them up, creating the future generations of leaders. She gives them ever-increasing responsibility and opportunity for growth, helping them to perform at the highest level and giving meaning to their work. She makes sure to praise their work to others, knowing that this recognition will help them now and later. She may have high expectations, and from time to time she might be tough on them, but no one will ever say that she didn’t expect their best work, that they didn’t grow when they worked for her, or that she didn’t care about them.

Great leaders hire strong. Weak leaders hire weak.

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7 Things I Was Never Allowed To Do http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/13/7-things-i-was-never-allowed-to-do/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/13/7-things-i-was-never-allowed-to-do/#respond Mon, 14 Jul 2014 01:25:50 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46419 7 Things I Was Never Allowed To Do is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

7 Things I Was Never Allowed To Do is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino A few months ago I started dedicating my Saturday blog post to the Hustler’s Playbook, my ideas about the beliefs, attributes, and actions that lead to success. A lot of it is mindset. Recently a friend [...]]]>

7 Things I Was Never Allowed To Do is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

A few months ago I started dedicating my Saturday blog post to the Hustler’s Playbook, my ideas about the beliefs, attributes, and actions that lead to success. A lot of it is mindset.

Recently a friend told me he looks forward to the Hustler’s Playbook posts on Saturday, and I revealed to him that I that I began writing them as ideas I wanted to give to my children. After I’d written a bit, I decided to publish them on the blog and then collect them into a Kindle book.

That got me thinking about what I learned from my Mother, the source of much of what I believe. She raised four children by herself, and her mother raised five children alone, making some of the ideas that follow at least a few generations old. I sent my Mom a text message with these ideas, and she was happy with me sharing them here. Here’s a list of things I wasn’t allowed to do.

Things I was never allowed to do:

  1. Believe I could not do something: I was never allowed to believe that I couldn’t do something. I have no better evidence of this than her unyielding support when I was kid and started a rock band. I think she even let me borrow her eyeliner. When I decided to pursue it more seriously, she even supported my move across the country to form a band and play in Los Angeles. I have dozens of other examples. I was never allowed to believe anything was beyond my reach if I put forth the effort.
  2. Feel sorry for myself. Countless times I tried to feel sorry for myself. I wanted pity. If I heard this sentence once, I heard it forty-three million times: “Suck it up. Be a man. I’m more of an man then you.” At the time my Mother said this it was certainly true. Rather than being allowed to wallow in my self-pity, she made me get up and take action. I learned that I had the power to do something, to act, instead of feeling bad. The lesson stuck . . . not that I had a choice.
  3. Treat other people poorly: I was never allowed to leave someone out, to treat them poorly, to make fun of them, or belittle them in any way. Instead, I was taught that I was to treat people exactly as I would want to be treated were I in their shoes. The idea of emotional intelligence hadn’t yet been invented, but I watched my Mom model it in her life every day. When I crossed the line, I was strongly reprimanded. I can’t even begin to quantify how helpful this rule has been.
  4. No one goes hungry while we can feed them. I grew up in an apartment complex. I hung around people who didn’t have much. Many of my friends that didn’t have much to eat or a place to stay ended up sleeping on a couch in my basement. They ended up eating in my kitchen. Even though she didn’t make enough money to support the five of us, she still found a way to feed other people. She watched her mom (who had even less) do the same thing.
  5. Back down from a bully. Lest I give you the impression that my sweet Mother was somehow soft, let me dissuade you of that belief now. I was never, ever allowed to back down from a bully. I heard, “You hit them. And you keep hitting them until they give up and until they never mess with you again.” I got in more than my fair share of tangles with more than my fair share of bullies. Even though I was terrible at fighting, her advice worked every time; the bullies found easier targets instead of having to deal with someone who was relentlessly trying to fight back. I don’t think she was in a position to raise weak children.
  6. Hold anger or resentment towards people who harmed me.  I have no idea how she did it, but she prevented me from ever harboring any anger or resentment at my Dad. She never let me hold anger at anyone. Still to this day, no matter the offense, I am still free of the burden of resentment.
  7. Feel unwanted or unloved. I was always happy as a kid (and still am now). I didn’t know I grew up poor until I was in my early thirties. I think the key to my happiness was that I was never allowed to feel unwanted or unloved. Even when we didn’t have any money, and even when the five of us lived in a tiny, three-bedroom apartment with one small bathroom, I never felt poor. We had love, and that was enough.

Questions

What values did your parents (or parent) instill in you?

What were you never allowed to do?

How have those beliefs shaped you?

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The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Never Stop Improving http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/12/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-never-stop-improving/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/07/12/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-never-stop-improving/#comments Sun, 13 Jul 2014 01:00:24 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46414 The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Never Stop Improving is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Never Stop Improving is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino When it comes to self-improvement, hustlers are unmatched. Ask any hustler and they’ve listened to everything Ziglar, Tracy, and Robbins have ever published. They’ve listened to Covey, Brown, and Rohn. They’ve watched all of the videos. They’ve [...]]]>

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Never Stop Improving is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

When it comes to self-improvement, hustlers are unmatched. Ask any hustler and they’ve listened to everything Ziglar, Tracy, and Robbins have ever published. They’ve listened to Covey, Brown, and Rohn. They’ve watched all of the videos. They’ve read the books.

When you hear a hustler talk about what they were doing before they really started to hustle, the story is always the same. They were in trouble and failing miserably. They were broke, often financially, psychologically, spiritually, and emotionally. But at some point, they started to take in seriously positive, empowering ideas, and those ideas took root.

You’ll hear stories about how they listened to Ziglar while driving in their to a sales call. You’ll hear stories about how they were up late watching television and bought Robbins’ stuff from an informercial. They’ll tell you about the first time the read Hill’s masterwork (and the second time they read it, and the third time the read it, ad infinitum).

The hustler will tell you how they spent money they didn’t have to invest in themselves. They’ll tell you that the actions they took after they changed their beliefs were the actions that helped them to hustle–and eventually succeed.

There are different varieties of non-hustlers. Some non-hustlers are cynics; they believe that positive, empowering thoughts and ideas are bunk, that the tools for a positive personal psychology are useless. Other non-hustlers refuse to invest in themselves, insisting they can’t afford to pay for programs, books, and course, yet always finding time and money for beers with the boys. And some non-hustlers believe that they are good enough as they are, where they are, refusing to be made uncomfortable by the belief that they could be more, do more, have more, and contribute more, the implications being too much for them.

The hustler is right now listening to an audio program, attending a workshop, or reading something they can use to improve their game. The non-hustler is right now falling further behind, failing to keep up with the world changing around them, and missing opportunities.

What are you doing to improve right now, this minute?

Questions

What is the last audio, video, or written program on self-improvement that you have purchased?

If you haven’t listened to it, watched it, or read it from cover to cover, why not?

How much will you invest in your personal development this year, hustler?

If you aren’t investing in yourself, what are you spending money on that could be diverted to the best results producing asset you will ever own: You?

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