The Sales Blog http://thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:41:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 S. Anthony Iannarino The Sales Blog clean The Sales Blog iannarino@gmail.com iannarino@gmail.com (The Sales Blog) S. Anthony Iannarino The Sales Blog http://thesalesblog.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://thesalesblog.com Concentrate On One Thing http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/18/concentrate-on-one-thing/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/18/concentrate-on-one-thing/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:41:51 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49609 There are so many distractions now that it’s very difficult to give anything your full, undivided attention. No matter how good your intentions, the potential distractions can be overwhelming. You never remove your smartphone from your hand for any period. If it isn’t in your hand, it’s sitting on your desk next to you, your […]

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There are so many distractions now that it’s very difficult to give anything your full, undivided attention. No matter how good your intentions, the potential distractions can be overwhelming.

You never remove your smartphone from your hand for any period. If it isn’t in your hand, it’s sitting on your desk next to you, your car seat, or your bedside table. Your laptop is always open, and if you’re like most people, the browser is always open. And if your computer is on with the browser open, chances are your email is open, and so are a few social sites.

Doing good work requires that you concentrate. Whatever you’re doing, do that and nothing else.

Email

If you are processing your email, process your email.

I don’t process my email in the morning until I have done the most important tasks I need to complete. On Mondays and Tuesdays I let a lot of email sit unread while I am doing higher value activities, screening it on my iPhone to delete nonsense and trivialities and responding to anything that is important. But most people can’t wait to get into their email box first thing in the morning (for reasons I don’t understand unless your email is somehow way different than mine).

If you are going to process your email, go ahead and do it completely. Respond to every email that requires a response. Delete all of the emails you don’t need to keep. And archive anything that needs to be archived. Move all of the tasks out and put them on your task manager so you can do them later.

Make email your focus and give it all of your attention. Don’t do anything else while you’re doing it.

Social Media

If you are Tweeting or using some other social platform, do that.

If you are going to go browse through the stream on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram, stop everything and do it. Like whatever you are going to like, retweet whatever you are going to retweet. Update your status with something pithy and original, and hang around a few minutes to reap the rewards that come in the form of likes if you need to.

Give the social channels your full attention. And don’t do anything else while you are doing it. It won’t help you produce the results you want, and it won’t get you paid, but if you are going to spend your time on social, dive in so you can finish it.

Calls

If you are making calls, make them.

If you are going to make your calls, close the browser, turn off the social channels and give yourself over to the phone. Your efficiency will improve, and so will your effectiveness.

Maybe making calls isn’t your work. Whatever your real work is, do that work. If you need to write, write. If you need to create a spreadsheet and analyze numbers, make the spreadsheet and do your work. If you need to complete a report, develop a strategy brief, or whatever it is you do, do that and nothing else.

Human Interactions!

If you are engaging with another human being, be engaged.

When you are with a human being, be completely with them. Put your smartphone down or turn off your notifications (My phone has a do not disturb function. Yours probably does, too). Close the browser, and then close the laptop lid.

Give that person your full, undivided attention without checking your phone, your social stream, or your email. There is nothing in any of these virtual places that won’t still be there when you get back. Human interactions are where the real action is.

If you are honest with yourself, I’ll bet you’re a little bored with the social streams, and a little burned out from trying to keep with all of the pings, dings, and notifications you receive. The truth of the matter is, it’s keeping you from doing good work, and it isn’t helping your real relationships either.

Doing exceptionally great work requires concentration. You can’t produce that quality if you are distracted and dividing your attention across your phone, your laptop, and your real work.

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Little White Lies http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/17/little-white-lies/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/17/little-white-lies/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 20:08:13 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49603 Last week I received a call from an entrepreneur. He’s got a successful business, and he just started a new business. This entrepreneur called to ask me to help him with one question he had about providing references to a big prospect he was close to closing. I mentioned a couple posts about providing references, […]

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Last week I received a call from an entrepreneur. He’s got a successful business, and he just started a new business. This entrepreneur called to ask me to help him with one question he had about providing references to a big prospect he was close to closing. I mentioned a couple posts about providing references, and he replied that he had read all of them.

In the middle of the sales process, this entrepreneur-salesperson mentioned to his prospective client that he could provide references of big, reputable companies should they require them. As they approached the time to decide, they asked him to provide those references. His problem is that his new business doesn’t have the references he casually mentioned to his prospective clients.

I don’t know the person I am writing about here. But I don’t think that he is guilty of malice aforethought when he promised to provide the references he didn’t have. I suspect he was caught up in the moment when he made that promise.

I didn’t have a lot to offer the caller in the way of helpful ideas. The best I could do was to tell him that I would tell them the truth, that I didn’t have any references from this new business, but that I have plenty from my existing business that could vouch for my character. I told him that he could also make them a special deal to avoid the risk of being his first customer in the new business if they needed greater assurance than references from his other business.

It’s important not to make promises casually. You may not believe that the promise is a big deal or that you are going to have to keep it. But your prospective client is likely to remember.

You never want to start a relationship with a lie. There is no business that is worth gaining if you have to lie to obtain it. Even little white lies.

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Do You Remember How to Close? http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/16/do-you-remember-how-to-close/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/16/do-you-remember-how-to-close/#comments Sun, 16 Aug 2015 18:48:47 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49597 Two weeks ago I told a client that his team needed to go back to the playbook I helped them build and the planned dialogues therein. He said, “To you those words are easy, but to our people they sound aggressive.” He’s not wrong. It’s contextual and cultural. I get it. But I don’t know […]

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Two weeks ago I told a client that his team needed to go back to the playbook I helped them build and the planned dialogues therein. He said, “To you those words are easy, but to our people they sound aggressive.” He’s not wrong. It’s contextual and cultural. I get it. But I don’t know anyone who uses softer direct language than I do.

I don’t believe salespeople will say words that make them feel bad about themselves. But you do have to ask for your dream client’s business.

Even a Child Can Do It

We teach small children to close by showing them how adults exchange value. We trade them dessert for eating their dinner. We offer to read them a story in exchange for their going to bed on time. We show them grown up human beings trade value for value to get what we want. And they quickly learn to mimic what they see.

Children then become better closers than the grown ups who trained them to close by being far more persistent (if you have children, you’ll remember this painful period). Children ask for what they want. If they hear the word “no,” they ask again. Given another “no,” a child will ask “why not,” trying to understand how they need to change their pitch to get what they want.

When a child doesn’t get what they want, they’ll change tactics. They’ll change from happy and eager to angry and distraught. No matter how young they are, they look for a new angle to get what they want rather than giving up.

Beat the Ask Out of Them

But over time, we train children to give up. They go too far and ask for things we can’t give them, and we have to say “no.” In the pre-teen years they ask to do things we can’t allow, and so we say “No. Are you out of your mind?!” They offer to trade value, like good grades or a clean room, but there is no exchange. We then teach them to take “no” for an answer. We teach them to give up. We say, “Stop asking! I am never going to allow you to . . .”

You Still Need to Ask

Closing isn’t a popular topic anymore. Very few people teach closing, and very little is written about it. This is unfortunate because most salespeople aren’t great at closing, whether that means asking for their dream client’s business at the end of the sales cycle or some other commitment earlier in the sales process. But you still need to know how to close.

You need to know how to say the words, “I very much want your business. Can we go ahead and get started?” I know salespeople who have never said the words “I really want your business,” believing that would somehow alienate their dream client or make them less consultative. But their prospective clients want them to ask. They want to give their business to someone who wants it. No prospect knows that they have to ask their salesperson if it’s finally okay to buy from them.

You also need to know how to say, “If there is nothing else you need us to change, your signature right here is all I need to get to work.” Too many salespeople leave the paperwork with their client or email it, hoping that their dream client will sign it of their volition. These salespeople are horrified at the thought of asking for a signature.

Ask Again

A lot of salespeople are horrified by the idea that they have to ask a second time if their dream client says “No, we’re not ready to buy,” or “We need some time to think this over.” A child would persist and say, “What do you need to think about,” so that they could figure out how to change the value proposition. But grown ups say, “Okay, when would you like me to call you back,” allowing their dream client to try to sort things out for themselves—making the one person responsible for helping them sort things out, the salesperson, completely irrelevant.

If any part of this makes you uncomfortable, you likely already have a problem closing—and asking for all the other commitments you need.

  • What language do you confidently use to ask for the commitments you need?
  • How do you persist when your dream client says “no” or says they need time to consider your offer?

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The Hustler’s Playbook: The Root of All Evil http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/15/the-hustlers-playbook-the-root-of-all-evil/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/15/the-hustlers-playbook-the-root-of-all-evil/#comments Sun, 16 Aug 2015 00:12:59 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49593 The last installment of The Hustler’s Playbook drew some interesting feedback in the comments section on Facebook (you can follow this blog on Facebook here). The gist of these comments regarding Hustlers hustling for freedom is that “money is the root of all evil.” But money isn’t the root of all evil. Fear is the […]

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The last installment of The Hustler’s Playbook drew some interesting feedback in the comments section on Facebook (you can follow this blog on Facebook here). The gist of these comments regarding Hustlers hustling for freedom is that “money is the root of all evil.”

But money isn’t the root of all evil. Fear is the root of all evil. Just like power, money doesn’t discriminate against who uses it and to what ends. Money is neutral.

Fear and the Lack of Money

When people fear that they don’t have enough of whatever they need, including money, they can behave badly.

The fear of not having enough to survive is why some people steal. It’s also why they rob other people at gunpoint. People that commit these crimes don’t believe they have better or easier choices. These actions look “evil,” even though the people perpetrating the crime have nothing. Money isn’t causing this bad behavior. It’s fear of not having what they believe they need.

A parent who steals money to feed their children isn’t driven by evil or a love of money. They’re driven by fear. The street hustler so many people conjure up in their minds when I use the word “hustler,” is also driven by fear, and they are willing to cheat others to gain money. But more money doesn’t resolve their fears.

Even people with a lot of money can be driven by this same fear.

Fear and the Lack of Importance

Some people behave badly when it comes to money as a way to deal with different fears. Some believe they aren’t “enough” and choose money as a way to increase their importance. Money is how they measure their own value. A part of this population will step on others, step over others, or push others off the ladder to success because they fear that there isn’t going to be enough for them to get their share.

People who allow money to be their master make poor choices. They do wrong in pursuit of money. Much like the street hustler, they lie, cheat, steal, trade on secret information, and design schemes that enrich themselves at other’s expenses. Their behavior is driven by their fear that they don’t have enough money. But they have the additional fear of losing money, and behave badly because not having money would threaten their identity.

Hustlers Aren’t Afraid

Hustlers are fearless. Ask a hustler what they would do if they lost everything and had to start over, and they will tell you that would rebuild everything they’d already built all over again. The hustler will tell you that they wouldn’t be thrilled with it, but it wouldn’t take them nearly as long. And they wouldn’t have to harm others to do it. They would just have to go create value for which others would be willing to pay.

People with a solid moral grounding aren’t compelled to do evil in pursuit of money. In fact, the more money they have, the more good works they do. You can’t be charitable without something be charitable with, including money and time.

When you see someone who is behaving badly, or what you might consider to be evil, ask yourself what fear you believe is driving that behavior. No matter how brave they may look, and no matter how much money they have, it’s fear that is compelling those decisions.

Money and power are both neutral. They are used by some to do good and others to do harm. Both reveal the person’s character.

  • How do you feel about money?
  • How would you be changed by having more?

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The Two Ways You Lose Deals Now http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/14/the-two-ways-you-lose-deals-now/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/14/the-two-ways-you-lose-deals-now/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 21:42:22 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49588 Selling is a complex and dynamic human interaction. There are a lot of things that can wrong that can cost you a deal. But there are two that tend to dominate the “reason” category for losses. The first is the lack of relationship, and the second is a lack of value creation. Relationships Matter I […]

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Selling is a complex and dynamic human interaction. There are a lot of things that can wrong that can cost you a deal. But there are two that tend to dominate the “reason” category for losses. The first is the lack of relationship, and the second is a lack of value creation.

Relationships Matter

I have met and spent time with Matt Dixon and Brent Adamson from CEB, the authors of The Challenger Sale. They’ve explained to me—and to countless other people—that their research suggests that Challengers (those who are willing to challenge their prospective clients) major in Challenging and minor in Relationships (where they had the second highest scores).

I’m not privy to CEB’s research, but I believe that the reason the Challenger can effectively do so is because they have excellent relationships (as well as a ton of business acumen and situational knowledge, something more than an insight provided by marketing). Matt and Brent’s hyperbolic headline notwithstanding, I don’t believe that they intended for you to stop worrying about relationships.

Right now, there is a ton of market pressure driving companies—and the people that make them up—to be more transactional. The communication methods we use are less personal than the traditional methods. The sales processes we implement are more transactional than they should be. The drive to reduce costs across all segments of the business, including sales, is causing companies to move parts of the sales function inside. And a lot of salespeople believe that are supposed to be transacting.

The more complex, risky, and expensive the solution you sell, the more you need relationships to succeed. Not going to meet your client because it is a plane trip away is a decision to ignore how important relationships are. Not spending time with your dream clients building trust and deepening your understanding is a decision that suggests you believe selling is really an arms-length decision. The trouble is, your clients will allow you to be as transactional as you want to be.

Don’t be surprised when you lose because no one really knows you. If you think that being known, liked, and trusted isn’t important, try to sell without them.

Value Matters as Much

This much is true: the friendship component that used to be the foundation of the relationship is no longer enough. The lack of a friendship’s ability to carry a deal is a dramatic change in sales over at least the last two decades. The shine on your shoes and smile on your face? Nice, but not enough. The dinners and the tickets to the ball game? Really nice, but still won’t substitute for real value.

Most of the time when we believe we lose because our price is higher we really lose because we didn’t create enough value. Sometimes we have trouble helping our clients perceive the value we create (something I won’t even pretend is easy). And occasionally we lose because our prospective client stubbornly adheres to the immature and expensive belief that lowest price is the only real value (something that should have been discovered early in the process).

One of the real challenges some people have in increasing the perception of value is that they haven’t spent enough time on the relationship to have all of the conversations necessary to changing that perception. They haven’t built the trust that the additional investment they are asking for is worth paying and that their prospect will capture the additional value. They also haven’t created a preference for themselves and their company, something that is often worth the difference in their price and their competitor’s price.

We can roll up dozens of problems to lack of value. Not following your sales process means not creating the right value for your prospect at the right time. Not gaining the commitments you need means failing to help your prospect take the necessary steps to get results, often because you fear imposing on them, or some such thing.

If your business is super-transactional, like Wal-Mart or Amazon, then by all means drop the relationship and get to lowest price as fast as you can (If Amazon hasn’t already beaten you to it, they soon will). But if your business is about customer intimacy, then work as hard as you can to move the only other direction can and get super-relational.

That means you develop relationships of value.

  • Look at the last few deals you lost. Were you known, liked, and trusted? Were you known as someone who can help deliver results?
  • Look at those same last lost deals. Did you create the right level of value, making price something less an important than the real outcomes your prospective client needed?
  • How did you lose the last deal you lost? What was the cause you lost? What would you change if you could go back and do it all over again?

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How To Not Look Stupid http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/13/how-to-not-look-stupid/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/13/how-to-not-look-stupid/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 01:10:36 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49581 “I don’t want to look stupid.” Some salespeople are afraid to call their dream clients because they believe that they may be asked a question to which they lack the answer. They are afraid that by not knowing the answer that they will lose their credibility. In their worse fear, instead of being perceived as […]

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“I don’t want to look stupid.”

Some salespeople are afraid to call their dream clients because they believe that they may be asked a question to which they lack the answer. They are afraid that by not knowing the answer that they will lose their credibility. In their worse fear, instead of being perceived as a value creator, they may be perceived as a time waster.

Like all fears, there is some real danger in looking stupid. But if you have to know the answer to any and every question your dream client may ask of you, you are always going to fear being stupid. The whole of human knowledge doubles every five years, and there is no way to keep up. The different questions that may be asked of you are limitless, and there is no way to anticipate or prepare for every question.

Fortunately, there are ways to not “look stupid.”

You Don’t Know Everything

First, don’t pretend to know everything. If you really want to avoid looking stupid, don’t answer questions for which you don’t know the answers. Nothing will ruin your credibility more than speaking about something you don’t know.

If you don’t want to be exposed as a time-wasting salesperson, then don’t pretend to be an expert in areas you don’t know.

You Are the Conductor

Second, when you are asked a question to which you don’t know the answer, say this, “That’s a great question. I don’t have an answer for you now, but I am going to get with my team here and get our best thinking on that. I’ll call you back this afternoon and tell you how we would answer that question and what we might suggest.”

The longer you work in one company or one industry, the more you gain the situational knowledge you need to answer your client’s questions. But you never have to know the answer to every question you might be asked.

As a salesperson, you orchestrate results. That means you are the conductor, not first violin. You are always allowed to lean our your subject matter and technical experts to serve your clients. Being resourceful enough to know how and where to get the answers your clients need is as important as developing situational knowledge.

  • What do you do when you don’t know the answer to a question your client asks?
  • How do you exercise your resourcefulness in helping your clients solve their biggest challenges?
  • Where do you go to get help answering your client’s questions?

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The Reason You Aren’t Being Hired to Sell http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/12/the-reason-you-arent-being-hired-to-sell/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/12/the-reason-you-arent-being-hired-to-sell/#comments Thu, 13 Aug 2015 00:40:19 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49576 What will you read here is straight talk. But it comes from a good place. A lot of people are looking for work in sales. They send me their resumes, even though I don’t place salespeople. They send me InMails on LinkedIn to tell me and everyone else that they are looking for a new […]

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What will you read here is straight talk. But it comes from a good place.

A lot of people are looking for work in sales. They send me their resumes, even though I don’t place salespeople. They send me InMails on LinkedIn to tell me and everyone else that they are looking for a new position. And then these job-seeking “salespeople” post their resumes on job boards and “apply for work.”

The problem here is pretty fundamental: the people looking for work in sales are supposed to be salespeople.

A company hires a salesperson to win new business. The first step in that process is reaching out and developing a relationship so that you can create that opportunity. Prospecting is what salespeople do every day. Except it appears when they want a job. When they want a job, they email people, post their resumes, and sit and wait by the phone. Or laptop.

If you are the kind of salesperson who emails people and patiently prays for a call, then you aren’t establishing that you are the kind of salespeople people need. You are projecting that you are exactly the kind of salesperson that most sales managers and sales leaders avoid hiring.

What should you do if you want to be hired to sell? Pick up the phone and call the hiring manager and book an appointment. Call them and ask them to interview you. Demonstrate that you have the exact skills they need. You will prove that you know how to prospect. By calling directly, you will have proven that you can sell. More importantly, you prove that you will sell—instead of waiting around for someone to read your resume and call you.

  • How close to your prospecting plan is your plan to get a new job?
  • What are you projecting as a salesperson while you are working on finding work?
  • If you were hiring a salesperson, how would a job-seeker distinguish themselves?

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Return On Negative Emotional Investments http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/11/return-on-negative-emotional-investments/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/11/return-on-negative-emotional-investments/#comments Wed, 12 Aug 2015 01:23:35 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49571 I stole the idea of mindset, skill set, and toolkit from Gerhard at Selling Power. There is a reason that mindset comes first in this triumvirate: without the right mindset, your skills and tools are worthless. Right now, too many people are full of fear, cynicism, and negativity. They expend a tremendous amount of emotional […]

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I stole the idea of mindset, skill set, and toolkit from Gerhard at Selling Power. There is a reason that mindset comes first in this triumvirate: without the right mindset, your skills and tools are worthless.

Right now, too many people are full of fear, cynicism, and negativity. They expend a tremendous amount of emotional energy on things that are negative, draining themselves of the energy they need to produce the results they want in their lives. Most of this fear, cynicism, and negativity is around things over which they have absolutely no control. Yet that is where their focus goes.

I know this. I was once infected by the very disease I am writing about here.

The Investment in “Those Guys”

The return on the emotional investment you make in worrying about, criticizing, or being frustrated by what other people do, say, or believe is 0.0%. You can double, triple, or quadruple your investment here without producing any positive return.

Some people feel it necessary to argue that other’s beliefs on race relations are wrong, that it is unfair how wealth is distributed, that “those guy’s” political beliefs are wrong, or that some people’s religious or spiritual choices are incorrect. They believe that their problems are “those guys,” ignoring the fact that they themselves are the source of their challenges. Look at your Facebook feed.

If you want to make change around some cause about which you have strong feelings, go work to make a difference. But otherwise, stop investing emotional energy on “those guys” and ruining your mindset.

The Investment in Past Crimes

There are some people who carry the heavy burden that is the collection of past crimes they believe others have committed against them. Some of these crimes are real, and many are imagined. Each time these “investors in past crimes” perceive that someone has wronged them, they scratch a little line in their imaginary book next to that person’s name. They relentlessly and meticulously keep score.

By investing in past crimes, you walk around assuming that everyone has bad intentions. You trust no one because no can be trusted. Everyone is suspect, and everyone has questionable motives. Even people who love you and who you are supposed to love.

Forgiveness is a gift you give yourself. If you are human, you will make mistakes, some great and some small. You are going to need to ask for forgiveness.

Your return on investment in keeping score of past crimes is 0.0%, compounding annually.

The Investment in Fear

Some people love to be frightened. They watch a lot of television. They get their news and information from sources that feed their fears. Because they feed their fears, the investor in fear sees the world as a dark and dangerous place. They believe that things have never been worse than they are now.

Because they are so deeply invested in the scary stories they tell themselves, they refuse any information to the contrary. To those who invest in fear, the world is a carefully constructed series of conspiracies designed to ruin their life—or worse.

Most of what these people fear isn’t worth fearing; none of it will come to pass. Some of what they fear may happen, but won’t have any appreciable impact on their life. But they can’t help themselves from sharing their fears and infecting others.

Bad things happen. But that isn’t what your life is made of. Most of the good things that happen go unreported.

Your return on investing in fear is something less than zero.

The investment in believing that your problems are “those guys,” “past crimes,” or feeding your “fears,” is a life that is less than it should be. You can choose what you focus on, and you can choose what you manifest in your life. It starts with your mindset and how you invest your emotional energy.

  • Who are “those guys” for you?
  • What past crimes do you need to let go?
  • What fears are you feeding?
  • Where do you need to make investments?

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Everything Is An Education http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/10/everything-is-an-education/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/10/everything-is-an-education/#comments Tue, 11 Aug 2015 00:47:14 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49566 Everything is an education. But only if you are willing to learn. You might make mistakes when you sell. You might skip over stages of your sales process and lose at the boardroom table. Because you didn’t discover what your prospective client wants, your solution doesn’t sound like the right answer. The fact that you […]

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Everything is an education. But only if you are willing to learn.

You might make mistakes when you sell.

You might skip over stages of your sales process and lose at the boardroom table. Because you didn’t discover what your prospective client wants, your solution doesn’t sound like the right answer. The fact that you blew past the consensus building means you don’t have the support you need. And the fact that you don’t have all the people on the buying committee in the room means you can’t get a “yes.”

Or maybe you hate the phone and spend your time searching for information to confirm your bias. You are emailing like crazy, but you aren’t getting appointments. You’re also using LinkedIn and Twitter to “connect” with prospects, but nothing’s doing. You’re waiting for marketing and inbound to do their jobs, but in the meantime, you are starving.

You don’t like asking people for things because it makes you feel “salesy.” You want to be consultative. You desperately want your dream clients to believe that you are their trusted advisor. So, you never espouse a strong point of view around your solution, and you wait for your dream client to ask you to take the next step. But they aren’t asking. And neither are you.

You might make mistakes when it comes to your mindset.

You spend your time with the cool kids being cynical, negative, and slack off during work hours. You and your little group of fellow travelers find dozens of things to complain about while you explain to each other how stupid your leadership team is. You absolve yourself of your responsibility for producing the results that you need by pointing the bony finger of indignation at anyone and everyone.

You can continue to repeat these sales mistakes as long as you want to. Your prospects and clients won’t tell you that your process is going to fail you (and them). Those who sell you the idea that you don’t need the phone aren’t going to suggest you pick up the phone. And your prospect is going to ask you if it’s okay to proactively make the commitment you are afraid to ask for.

You can continue to make the mindset mistakes that will make you average—or something less than that—for years. Maybe even decades. Your peers are never going to admit that they are infected with negativity and scarcity. They’re never going to admit they are mediocre on their very best day.

You only learn when you accept that you are the one who is making these mistakes and that you are the only one who can change.

  • In what areas of your life are your results less than you want them to be?
  • What lessons are you not learning?

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The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Seek Freedom http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/09/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-seek-freedom/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2015/08/09/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-seek-freedom/#comments Mon, 10 Aug 2015 00:12:25 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=49555 To non-hustlers, it can look as if the Hustler seeks certain things. It appears that Hustlers are seeking money, wealth, and status. But these aren’t the things that the Hustler seeks. These are the things that accrue to the Hustler as she pursues what she seeks. The Freedom of Choice The Hustler seeks money because […]

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To non-hustlers, it can look as if the Hustler seeks certain things. It appears that Hustlers are seeking money, wealth, and status. But these aren’t the things that the Hustler seeks. These are the things that accrue to the Hustler as she pursues what she seeks.

The Freedom of Choice

The Hustler seeks money because it provides the freedom of choice. Without money, you have limited choices. When you have little money–or even just enough money–you have limited experiences. You can’t afford to do the things you wish you could do. The Hustler doesn’t want the money. They want the choices that money provides.

The Freedom of Security

The Hustler seeks wealth, too. But not for the reasons you believe. They seek wealth because wealth provides the freedom of certainty. Wealth provides security. A lot of Hustlers were born with nothing, and their strong desire for wealth is a manifestation of their fear of having too little for too long.

The Freedom to Contribute

There are some Hustlers who seek status. Everyone has an inborn need to be important and significant in some way. But the status isn’t something the Hustler seeks. “Status” is something that accrues to the Hustler because of the contribution they make. The more successful the Hustler is, the more people they employ and the bigger their company. The more people the Hustler serves, the more people know them for their contribution. Some Hustlers end up with their name on a building at some hospital or University.

Energetic Non-Hustlers

Money-motivated people aren’t very interesting to be around, and they don’t tend to make a real difference in other people’s lives. People who seek fame, or status, without making any real contribution are terribly uninteresting. People who are motivated by money and fame are very different than a Hustler.

The Hustler seeks freedom. They seek the freedom of choice and the experiences that make up an interesting life. They seek the freedom of certainty and the absence of fear. They seek the freedom to make a contribution in the areas that they believe are important. Freedom is what the Hustler seeks most of all.

  • What freedoms do you seek?
  • Why do you want those freedoms?
  • What price are you willing to pay to be truly free?

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