The Sales Blog http://thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino Fri, 22 Aug 2014 14:31:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 On Recognizing Bad Advice on the Internet http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/21/on-recognizing-bad-advice-on-the-internet/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/21/on-recognizing-bad-advice-on-the-internet/#respond Fri, 22 Aug 2014 01:00:32 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46761 On Recognizing Bad Advice on the Internet is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

On Recognizing Bad Advice on the Internet is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino The Internet is the world’s largest and most complete advice column ever assembled. Anyone and everyone has the power to offer you their advice on any number of topics, regardless of whether or not their advice is [...]]]>

On Recognizing Bad Advice on the Internet is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The Internet is the world’s largest and most complete advice column ever assembled. Anyone and everyone has the power to offer you their advice on any number of topics, regardless of whether or not their advice is sound. This means you will find good advice, bad advice, and everything in between.

I share my thoughts and ideas, so I am not immune from what I am about to write here.

You need to be careful where you get your advice. You need to discern whether or not it is valuable for you. Here are a few tests you might consider.

Integrity: I recently found out that one group that is very big in the world of social selling has a department that makes cold calls on prospective clients. No one talks about this group, and they kept it very quiet. But this advice is contrary to their messaging. If the person offering their advice doesn’t practice what they preach, it probably isn’t a good idea to follow that advice.

[Note: Be careful here. Sometimes the advice you are receiving may be exactly right for you and wrong for the person who is giving it.]

Circumstances: Sometimes the advice given assumes a certain set of circumstances. Let’s stick with cold calling. The person telling you that you don’t need to cold call may not need to cold call themselves. They may very easily generate enough leads through other methods. But their circumstance may not be your circumstances. The “you should never cold call again” advice may be criminal negligence or malpractice of some kind.

I love the GTD methodology as developed by David Allen. But this methodology is hard to learn and harder to practice. It might be overkill for you. But for my complex life, it works wonderfully. My circumstances aren’t your circumstances.

It’s Easy: Whenever someone claims that results are easy, that lots of people are producing easy results, and that you can do the same, you need to be skeptical. If you need advice on anything serious, then it’s likely that the result isn’t easy to produce.

If the advice makes something easy, then you might want to consider looking for a more honest assessment of what is necessary.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/21/on-recognizing-bad-advice-on-the-internet/feed/ 0
Being Small Makes You Smaller http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/20/being-small-makes-you-smaller/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/20/being-small-makes-you-smaller/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 01:26:31 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46756 Being Small Makes You Smaller is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Being Small Makes You Smaller is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino You don’t make yourself bigger by making other people smaller. You can’t drag enough people down to build a big enough pile on which to stand and be taller. That doesn’t make you bigger. You can’t draw positive attention [...]]]>

Being Small Makes You Smaller is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

You don’t make yourself bigger by making other people smaller. You can’t drag enough people down to build a big enough pile on which to stand and be taller. That doesn’t make you bigger.

You can’t draw positive attention to yourself by making other people the focus on your negativity. Your negativity reflects poorly on you, and it does nothing to harm the person on whom you focused it.

You don’t produce good or interesting or thought-provoking content by criticising other people’s content. If your ideas are better, they will find their way to the top of the heap under their own power. There is no way to bulldoze the better content out of your way.

You don’t make your voice heard by raising your voice or making harsh statements. No one hears your personal attacks on others. You only make your voice heard by honing and sharpening your message until it resonates in the ears of the intended.

You don’t win friends and influence people by attacking other people. You win friends and influence people by helping build people up. You grow bigger by helping other people grow bigger.

At some point you have to decide what you want your legacy to be. What do you want to be remembered for? When people remember you, what do you want them to remember about you? Will you look back and recognize what you have accomplished as something good, and true, and beautiful? Or will you see a trail of negativity, jealousy, and bitterness leading straight back into you?

Being small only makes you smaller.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/20/being-small-makes-you-smaller/feed/ 0
You Cannot Be a Smart Asshole http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/19/you-cannot-be-a-smart-asshole/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/19/you-cannot-be-a-smart-asshole/#respond Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:00:09 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46749 You Cannot Be a Smart Asshole is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

You Cannot Be a Smart Asshole is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino There is no such thing as a smart asshole. You can’t be both of those things at the same time; and if you are the latter, then you are not the former. There are lots of different lines [...]]]>

You Cannot Be a Smart Asshole is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

There is no such thing as a smart asshole. You can’t be both of those things at the same time; and if you are the latter, then you are not the former.

There are lots of different lines of intelligence. Howard Gardner of Harvard wrote a book making the case that cognitive abilities were only one of about a dozen intelligences, including musical, visual-spatial, verbal-linguistic, kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and existential. Ken Wilber’s research has identified another dozen or so lines of intelligence. There might be 24 or more different, measurable, verifiable lines of intelligence.

But none of these reflect your real intelligence. Let’s call your real intelligence your working intelligence.

Your working intelligence can be measured by whatever line and scale you prefer minus how much of an asshole you are (AHQ). The more of an asshole you are, the less intelligent you are. You see, if you were intelligent you wouldn’t be an asshole. If you were intelligent, you would know how to make your point in a way that didn’t harm other people.

145 on the IQ and 150 on an AHQ gives you a -5.

You’re super-smart when it comes to rational-logical thinking. In fact, people describe you as brilliant as they hurry to get as far away from you as they possibly can. It doesn’t matter what your IQ is if your EQ is so low that no one wants to work with you.

Maybe you are a gifted athlete or musician. If you treat people badly, then you are not intelligent. You are just gifted in one narrow line. That doesn’t make you smart.

I know you have examples. Smart people like Jobs are surrounded by people that act as a buffer to keep them from blowing up everyone around them.

People are going to remember how you made them feel. They are going to be influenced by how much they believe you care about them. No one ever looks back and says, “Man, he treated me like I was dirt, but I loved him because he was so smart.”

115 on the IQ test and 5 on the AHQ gives you a 110. That’s 105 points higher than the example above, and it means you are likely way more effective with people.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/19/you-cannot-be-a-smart-asshole/feed/ 0
What I Am Thinking About Now http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/18/what-i-am-thinking-about-now/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/18/what-i-am-thinking-about-now/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:56:14 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46741 What I Am Thinking About Now is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

What I Am Thinking About Now is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Segmentation by Generation: Every generation looks at the next couple generations and decides that “these damn kids” are different, that they don’t share the same values, and that they’re making a mess of things. The Millennials all got [...]]]>

What I Am Thinking About Now is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Segmentation by Generation: Every generation looks at the next couple generations and decides that “these damn kids” are different, that they don’t share the same values, and that they’re making a mess of things. The Millennials all got awards at the end of soccer season, even when they lost. They don’t care about money, and they are never going to leave their parents’ houses. They’re way too open-minded. We’ll see. One thing is for certain, the generations before them won’t understand them. It’s a rite of passage. My bet is that they won’t be all that different, but they will feel the same way about their children and grandchildren.

A Lot of Research Isn’t Useful. Yet.: I love it that we can do fMRI imaging of brains. I am certain there are great insights being discovered every day. But they are absolutely meaningless in practice. There is nothing neuroscience has taught us that is applicable when you are sitting in front of another human being that human evolution didn’t already provide. You want to know how to tell if someone is lying based on the latest brain research? You already know when someone is lying, don’t you? Your gut tells you. This will, however, change. We are going to figure out what we are figuring out, and it will be useful.

It’s the Creative’s World (You’re Just Living In It): Everything that can be done by a robot or a computer eventually will be. That means the future is going to be owned–even more than it is now–by the creative class. The people who are going to be in greatest demand are people who can create, people with imaginations, people who can produce new works. Also, people who know how to work with their hands, craftsmen. Some of the first craftsmen are going to make individual works using new technologies, like 3D printing. You are going to pay for things that were not mass produced.

Fragmentation: We used to have three television channels. Everyone had a common set of experiences because of that box. We had a few channels on FM Radio, and the powers-that-be (or powers-that-were, more accurately) used to determine what music we listened to. We had common experiences. Big stars were made. Now, everybody has access to the tools to create and distribute. This has resulted in serious fragmentation. We no longer share the cultural experiences that television, radio, movies and entertainment provided. There are no great acts.

Polarization: More and more, people are being polarized by their political beliefs. The discourse is coarser. Things that should unite us divide us because the political parties and their staunchest supporters frame every issue with the sole intention of reaching some segment of the population they believe necessary by demonizing someone or something else. Politicians no longer stand for anything. Instead, they just oppose things. They don’t have a vision of their own. They just oppose the other side’s vision, which doesn’t really exist anyway.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/18/what-i-am-thinking-about-now/feed/ 0
The Leadership Playbook: Leaders Over-Communicate http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/the-leadership-playbook-leaders-over-communicate/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/the-leadership-playbook-leaders-over-communicate/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 01:28:14 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46733 The Leadership Playbook: Leaders Over-Communicate is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The Leadership Playbook: Leaders Over-Communicate is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Once I was speaking at a conference when the CEO of the company leaned over and whispered in my ear. He said, “I am giving the same speech I’ve given the last two years. The stories are different. The [...]]]>

The Leadership Playbook: Leaders Over-Communicate is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Once I was speaking at a conference when the CEO of the company leaned over and whispered in my ear. He said, “I am giving the same speech I’ve given the last two years. The stories are different. The examples are different, too. But it’s the same message.”

The CEO wondered whether he was wrong in doing so, and asked me what I thought. I told him, “Your message was right three years ago. It was right last year. And it’s right this year. As soon as you change your message, your people are going to be confused about who they are and where they are going. You aren’t delivering change. You’re doubling down.”

Great leaders relentlessly communicate their message.

Mission: Great leaders relentlessly communicate their company’s mission. Those who never speak of “mission,” never capture the hearts and minds of the people they have the honor to lead. Great leaders aren’t afraid to communicate about the difference their organization is making, and they remind their teams of that mission with a steady stream of examples.

Vision: Great leaders also take every opportunity to remind the people they lead where they are going, how they are going to get there, and who they are going to become. They communicate this vision, knowing that they win converts slowly and over time.

Values: A leader leads through her values. What is important to her is important to her organization. What she ignores, they will also ignore. Great leaders draw a line in the sand separating “who we are” from “who we will never be.” I know one leader who refuses to make money from his vendors, money his competitors take. I know another who never stops talking about caring. Their companies live those values.

Who We Are: Effective leaders talk about their competition. They explain to the people they lead how they are different from their competitors, why they do things different, and why it matters. By talking about these things, they help the people they lead understand their place in the world.

As a leader, it is impossible to over-communicate in any of these areas. It is possible to cause people to lose their enthusiasm if you don’t bring these ideas to life with stories, anecdotes, and examples of people getting things right.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/the-leadership-playbook-leaders-over-communicate/feed/ 0
[Video] Are You Even Proactive, Bro? http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/video-are-you-even-proactive-bro/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/video-are-you-even-proactive-bro/#respond Sun, 17 Aug 2014 22:48:31 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46728 [Video] Are You Even Proactive, Bro? is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

[Video] Are You Even Proactive, Bro? is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Subscribe to my YouTube channel here.]]>

[Video] Are You Even Proactive, Bro? is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/17/video-are-you-even-proactive-bro/feed/ 0
The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Pay for Success in Advance http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/16/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-pay-for-success-in-advance/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/16/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-pay-for-success-in-advance/#respond Sun, 17 Aug 2014 02:29:44 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46723 The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Pay for Success in Advance is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Pay for Success in Advance is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Success is an outcome that you pay for in advance. Hustlers know that they have to pay the price in advance for what they want, and they never worry about the price. They know that [...]]]>

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Pay for Success in Advance is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Success is an outcome that you pay for in advance. Hustlers know that they have to pay the price in advance for what they want, and they never worry about the price. They know that the greater the outcome, the more they will have to pay to achieve it. The hustler pays the full price in advance. The non-hustler, on the other hand, believes they can have success without paying for it.

Hustlers often want financial success. But they don’t believe that they should only create more value once they are paid more money. In fact, they believe that by creating more value they will be worth more money, and they focus on creating that value. The non-hustler believes that they should only do more work once they are paid some greater amount of money.

The hustler pays in advance by showing up early, staying late, and working harder than anyone else. The hustler looks for ways to create more value in everything do, putting more effort, more energy, and more care into everything they do. The non-hustler does the minimum required and not one bit more.

The hustler can’t be outworked. The hustler knows that the harder they work, the larger the payment they are making towards their success. The hustler is paying the interest, the principal, and an additional payment. The non-hustler refuses to any more than anyone else, and by doing so isn’t making any payment towards a future results. The non-hustler is making an interest-only payment, never paying down the principal.

But hustlers don’t only apply this principle to financial success. They apply to every aspect of their life.

If a hustler’s goal is new customers, they work to build and nurture those relationships, aggressively creating value for their would-be clients. They know when they’ve paid enough they’ll have the client. The non-hustler believes that they should only create value for clients and prospects once they are being paid.

If a hustler’s goal is to strengthen their family relationships, the hustler does whatever it takes to invest their time and emotion now, knowing that this is their legacy. [Note: You might think that the hustler is hustling for their own significance and personal achievement, but you’d likely be wrong. Hustlers always have people counting on them, and that is the sustainable fuel for their internal fire].

Only when you pay in full for what you want will you have it.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/16/the-hustlers-playbook-hustlers-pay-for-success-in-advance/feed/ 0
Tonight People Are Afraid http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/15/tonight-people-are-afraid/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/15/tonight-people-are-afraid/#respond Sat, 16 Aug 2014 02:09:40 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46690 Tonight People Are Afraid is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Tonight People Are Afraid is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Tonight people are afraid. In some places they are afraid for their lives. They are afraid for the lives of their families and loved ones. They are afraid for their communities. Their fear is very real, and for many the [...]]]>

Tonight People Are Afraid is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Tonight people are afraid. In some places they are afraid for their lives. They are afraid for the lives of their families and loved ones. They are afraid for their communities. Their fear is very real, and for many the danger they face is very real.

Some fear others who don’t look like them. Some fear those who don’t believe what they believe. They fear the differences. Some have been taught this fear from the time of their birth; it’s an inherited fear that hardens their worldview from an early age. Their fear doesn’t allow them to recognize that we are all the same.

For some this fear is a quiet loathing, something always simmering underneath and never spoken of. For others this fear turns into a vocal detestation. And for a few, fear turns into hatred, and hatred turns into violence. Their fear overwhelms them, and as they destroy others they unknowingly and unintentionally sacrifice themselves.

At the core of the most horrific news stories you read, the cause is always the same: fear.

Fear has one enemy. There is only one thing that can defeat it, and that thing is Love. Love is the heart of understanding. Love is compassion.

Fear causes problems from one end of the Earth to the other, most of which are beyond your reach. But because you can’t fight it everywhere doesn’t mean you can’t do anything.

Tonight do something wherever you are, however small it might be. Do what you can. The battle is being fought everywhere, every day. What you do may not make a difference everywhere, but it makes a difference where you are right now.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/15/tonight-people-are-afraid/feed/ 0
Ten Mandatory Sales Disciplines http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/14/ten-mandatory-sales-disciplines/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/14/ten-mandatory-sales-disciplines/#respond Fri, 15 Aug 2014 00:58:20 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46651 Ten Mandatory Sales Disciplines is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Ten Mandatory Sales Disciplines is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Closing: The discipline of closing is the gaining of commitments. This is the first discipline because commitments are what allow you to create opportunities, create value, and win deals. This is the first discipline. Prospecting: The discipline of prospecting requires [...]]]>

Ten Mandatory Sales Disciplines is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Closing: The discipline of closing is the gaining of commitments. This is the first discipline because commitments are what allow you to create opportunities, create value, and win deals. This is the first discipline.

Prospecting: The discipline of prospecting requires that you speak to your dream clients to ask them for their time and for an opportunity to explore working together. This is the second discipline because no deal is ever created or closed before it is opened.

Nurturing: The discipline of nurturing requires that you communicate value to your dream clients over a long period of time, making yourself known, and making yourself known as a value creator.

Planning: The discipline of sales call planning allows you to use both your time and your dream client’s time effectively. It allows you to plan to create value and establish yourself as a true professional.

Value Creation: The discipline of value creation requires that you ensure that your dream client benefits from every engagement with you, including every sales interaction, and every deal.

Caring: The discipline of caring is what ensures that you aren’t self-oriented and that you establish trust. It makes you other-oriented.

Integrity: The discipline of integrity is also necessary for trust. It is the discipline of being honest and walking your talk.

Listening: This discipline, combined with caring, is the heart of understanding. Your dream clients want to be heard, want to be significant, and want to collaborate. The discipline of listening is how you meet those needs.

Follow Up: The discipline of follow up is your keeping the commitments you make to your dream clients, no matter how large or small. It is one of the ways trust is established and maintained.

Profit: The discipline of profit ensures that you make enough money to successfully deliver for your clients and that you have enough left over to develop greater levels of value in the future.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/14/ten-mandatory-sales-disciplines/feed/ 0
Social Is One to Many http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/13/social-is-one-to-many/ http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/13/social-is-one-to-many/#respond Thu, 14 Aug 2014 00:10:48 +0000 http://thesalesblog.com/?p=46645 Social Is One to Many is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Social Is One to Many is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino Social Media was once called Social Media Marketing because, when marketers grabbed hold of the tools, they recognized them as one to many. The battle over whether or not the tools are for community or marketing can be traced back to 1999, [...]]]>

Social Is One to Many is a post from: The Sales Blog | S. Anthony Iannarino

Social Media was once called Social Media Marketing because, when marketers grabbed hold of the tools, they recognized them as one to many. The battle over whether or not the tools are for community or marketing can be traced back to 1999, and I offer the best of all evidence, The Cluetrain Manifesto.

Your Facebook post is worthless if it is only seen by one person (unless that is how you define your market). Your Tweets are seen by all of your followers. If your tweet was seen by only one person, you wouldn’t need Twitter. Now LinkedIn offers a publishing platform, recognizing that part of the value of having a network is being able to communicate with that network.

Social. Selling?

Let’s pretend you found your dream client on LinkedIn. You research the client, looking at their background, their interests, what groups they belong to, and maybe you find something they created and posted themselves. There is nothing social about that. It’s research. The only thing that has changed is the tool you have used.

Now you reach out make a connection request. That’s a one-to-one activity, and it feels like sales because you are asking for a commitment (albeit a very small commitment, often one with as much significance as being someone’s friend on Facebook).

What do you do next?

Let’s say you are one of the nervous kind who wouldn’t dare email your dream client to ask for an appointment. Nor would you dare to pick up the phone call them, cold calling being dead and all. So you decide to publish on LinkedIn, hoping that your dream client will read your excellent opinion on the industry. Maybe you believe that, upon recognizing your brilliance, your dream client will pick up the phone and call you, begging you to come in so they can give your their business. Publishing is one-to-many, and that makes it marketing and that makes it not sales (it’s publishing!).

Pretend that your published post didn’t grab your dream client’s attention. I know, it was a great post. Just pretend. You and your dream client are both members of an industry group. You find a question your dream client has asked, and you post a killer response. That post is public, so it’s mostly one-to-many. But wait. Your dream client responds to your comment. Now it’s one-to-one. But there was no ask, no commitment, and you’re not one inch closer to a deal than you were before he commented. No, you’re still not selling.

No one is a greater proponent of the social marketing toolkit than me (except maybe Koka Sexton, Jill Rowley, and Jamie Shanks).

You have never had a better set of tools for building your personal brand. You have never been able to project the value you create to the people who would most benefit from what you do as easily and effectively as you can now. If you aren’t using the tools, you are woefully behind right now. The line between marketing and sales is so blurry right now it’s difficult to tell where one ends and the other begins. So let me draw the line for you.

One to many is marketing (your posts, your tweets, your pictures, etc.). One to one with no ask and no commitment-gaining is nurturing, a more personal form of marketing. One to one with an ask and a commitment gained is selling.

Directly asking one-to-one on social is taboo (but Gary Vaynerchuck does it without fear). It looks self-oriented. The social folks generally look down on pitching. Pitching one to many is marketing. Pitching one to one over social is weird.

Directly asking for commitments face-to-face or on the telephone is personal. It’s one to one, as it should be.

]]>
http://thesalesblog.com/blog/2014/08/13/social-is-one-to-many/feed/ 0