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How Long Before You Too Disappear

Your dream client has seen your kind before. They’ve seen the new salesperson come in full of excitement and ambition. They’ve seen that salesperson work like the devil to build consensus around a deal. They talked a great game, and they did a wonderful job selling themselves and their company.

Then it came time for the execution. The salesperson was nowhere to be found, and all of the calls for help went to people they’d never even met. Sometimes the execution on the original sale went okay, and the salesperson was present. But then he had the business, and there wasn’t any reason to show his face or spend time with them anymore. Complacency set in, and it was followed closely by dissatisfaction. A dissatisfaction that went unnoticed until it was too late.

Now you’re here, all full of piss and vinegar. You look familiar. You sound familiar. It conjures up memories of promises made and not kept. The promises are new coming from you, no doubt, but they sound the same. You can see that your dream client contacts are incredulous. It’s written all over their faces.

And so your dream client contacts begin to ask themselves this question: “How long before you too disappear?”

Where will you be when the bullets start flying?

What is your plan to go from quarter to quarter, from project to project, continually finding ways to help your dream client?

What is your plan to keep from growing complacent and to help keep your client from growing complacent?

How do you and your dream client contacts continue to work together to go from success to success, always pushing the boundaries out a little further and helping each other grow?

Why should your dream clients believe that you are any different than those that have come before you, those that made the sales they needed to make and slowly faded away, never to be heard from again?

Sales is a fashion business. Every season you have to release a new line. You have to find something new and interesting to show your clients. And it must be something that makes a difference for them and their business. If you are going to be relevant, you can’t disappear. If you are going to earn your place as their strategic partner, you have to maintain a presence.

Don’t disappear.


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Comments

comments

  • http://www.twitter.com/zacmacinnes Zac Macinnes

    “Every season you have to release a new line.” Well said, and I couldn’t agree more.

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.ross.71697092 David Ross

    I couldn’t agree with your article more. I’ve seen to many sales people disappear. That’s why I consider my customers my friends. I’m there to catch the bullets.

    • http://www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      If they know you are in the foxhole with them, you can’t count on their business . . . because they know they can count on you.

  • Scott Spiker

    Thanks for the article. I have walked strait into a wall with customers only to learn that the previous sales person got the PO and walked away, never to appear again. It comes down to the idea of “what am I building?” Am I working for a short term sale, a one off, or am I building a legacy account that will continue to grow for years to come? I prefer to choose the latter and have great business partnerships as a result.

    • http://www.thesalesblog.com S. Anthony Iannarino

      A solid, solid plan. Relationships require long-tern investments.